TorCHI  Toronto Region Computer Human Interaction

Collaborative Gift Giving with GiveButtons

  • 26 May 2011
  • 7:00 PM
  • Bahen Room 1130 (ground floor), 40 St. George Street
Abstract: The retail value chain has been continuously evolving over past decades with disruptive innovations in all aspects of retailing including methods of payment, fulfilment, and product search/selection. With the arrival of social commerce there is now the potential for a new disruptive innovation where groups of people purchase collaboratively. GiveButtons is a first of its kind system where a gift giving community is formed, with its members having the power to purchase gifts collaboratively. GiveButtons provides a novel way to aggregate consumer demand across a wide range of product categories. Built as a Facebook Application, with curated collections, birthday (and other) reminders, social media functions, micropayments, and delegated ordering and shipping, GiveButtons is positioned to revolutionize the art of gift giving. This talk will begin with a review of the evolution of shopping, from barter to eCommerce. Collaborative gift giving as a social commerce activity will then be discussed, and GiveButtons will be demonstrated. It is expected to be an interactive presentation with plenty of opportunity for questions, comments and feedbacks from the audience. We will be offering GiveButtons discounts to those who attend this presentation.

Bio: Mark Chignell is a Professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, where he has been on the faculty since 1990. Prior to that he was an Assistant Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California from 1984 to 1990. He has a Ph.D in Psychology (University of Canterbury, New Zealand, 1981), and an M.S. in Industrial and Systems Engineering (Ohio State, 1984). Mark is currently President of Vocalage Inc., a University of Toronto spinoff company, director of the Interactive Media Lab, and a visiting scientist at both the IBM Centre for Advanced Studies and Keio University in Japan.
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